Recycled Chicken Coop

That’s right, I have started to raise a few backyard chickens for laying eggs only.  I really love fresh eggs and the idea of controlling what chemicals, or antibiotics, or Lord knows what else that my chickens eat.  I am really interested in the “fertilizer” for my composting too.  The extra added bonus is that the chickens eat weeds and bugs and I’ve got plenty.

I’ve been toying with this idea for a while now.   We live in the county, and after talking to a neighbor about her chickens, I’ve been researching everything I can find about raising them.   All of this started last fall, and here it is spring  I also love recycling and am an avid curb shopper.  I’ll just put that out there right now.  I do curb shop and frequently, and am shameless about it.  During the mulling things over stage I happened on a curb pile that had an old wooden playhouse.  Perfect roof and 1 complete side AND it was the side with the little wooden shutters and a little door cutout.  How perfect was that for the start of a coop?  Of course it was a sign (with my family, everything starts with a “sign”) that raising chickens was meant to be, why else would someone throw out a perfectly good roof and 1 wall?   That’s when things started moving a little faster.  I say a “little” faster because when you curb shop, it takes a while to find all the things you need, and you end up taking all kinds of junk from the curb because you aren’t sure if you may need it down the line.  I think you can imagine where this is all going.  I do tend to look like a hoarder, at least from my carport I do.  Here is a pictorial to bring us more up to date.

The 1st curb find and most important!  Nice and sturdy too.

The 1st curb find and most important! Nice and sturdy too.

This is the only wall that was with the roof, but a real score with the shutters and door.

This is the only wall that was with the roof, but a real score with the shutters and door.

These legs were on the curb with a tabletop that was not in good condition.

These legs were on the curb with a tabletop that was not in good condition.

remade the wall with the shutters.

remade the wall with the shutters.

Pallet wood was used to build the walls and some old fence pickets.

Pallet wood was used to build the walls and some old fence pickets.

Had some old paint from previous projects.

Had some old paint from previous projects.

Floor was made from old fence pickets we found.

Finished painting the coop!

The entire coop, sans chicken wire, cost me about $6.00 for a couple of hinges.  One whole side wall opens outwards for easy cleaning.  Oh and I found a couple of thrown out cabinets.  Not big kitchen cabinets, but smaller and there was just this one piece with two doors that are maybe 2- 1/2′ W x 15″ H.  Perfect for nesting boxes, you’ll see.  The mister had to attach that off the back.  We actually found an old piano hinge on something on the curb (these sell for about $20 bucks at the hardware store) and removed it.  We used it on the nesting box lid that opens from the top of the nesting boxes for removing eggs from outside the coop.  The front cabinet doors will be used for easier cleaning from the outside.

I will post more pictures later, and introduce you to all my “girls”.   I hope everyone is happy in whatever they choose to do in their personal time.  I just happen to like making my own stuff, but you may be happy reading old comic books.  I wish for all people to have some escape and happiness while doing it.  It is therapy for the soul.

 

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3 Comments

Filed under chicken coop, chickens, DIY, Handmade

3 responses to “Recycled Chicken Coop

  1. I have been thinking about adding a few chickens in the mix for my blog at http://www.radishdiet.com, but not sure how to keep them corralled and halfway quiet. Love to see how it works for you.

    • So far so good with the chickens. They are 3 1/2 months old now, and I have just the four hens. They are surprisingly quiet, but my backyard and surrounding neighborhood has lots of birds chirping and dogs barking and such. There are some really loud birds around here early in the mornings (most noticeable on weekends), and my chickens little clucking is nothing. Just 4 chickens though, and the same with the smell, not bad at all (not as bad as the neighbor’s cat that poops in my yard and doesn’t have the common decency to cover it!)

  2. You’ve convinced me to go for it. We used to have chickens when we lived in the country 25 yrs ago and I remember how much enjoyment there was feeding and gathering eggs. 4 sounds like a good number. I’ll blog about it on http://www.radishdiet.com and let everyone know how it goes. Love to have you as a guest blogger.

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